JMIR Diabetes

Emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, sensors, and informatics to help people with diabetes

Editor-in-Chief:

Tiffany I. Leung, MD, MPH, FACP, FAMIA, FEFIM (Acting Editor-in-Chief), Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Southern Illinois Univerisity School of Medicine, USA & Scientific Editor at JMIR Publications


JMIR Diabetes (JD) is a PubMed/PubMed Central- and Scopus-indexed journal (Citescore 2022: 3.4, Q2).

JMIR Diabetes focuses on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics and patient education for diabetes prevention, self-management, care, and cure, to help people with diabetes. We also accept papers that do not have a digital health component but represent a significant innovation for diabetes prevention and care.

We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews) covering, for example, wearable devices and trackers, mobile apps, glucose monitoring (including emerging technologies such as Google contact lens), medical devices for insulin and metabolic peptide delivery, closed loop systems and artificial pancreas, telemedicine, web-based diabetes education and elearning, innovations for patient self-management and "quantified self", diabetes-specific EHR improvements, clinical or consumer-focused software, diabetes epidemiology and surveillance, crowdsourcing and quantified self-based research data, new sensors and actuators to be applied to diabetes.

As an Open Access journal, JMIR Diabetes is read by clinicians and patients alike and have (as all JMIR Publications journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies, as well as on diabetes prevention and epidemiology.

 

Recent Articles

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Patient Experiences with Diabetes Technology

Patient engagement with secure messaging (SM) via digital patient portals has been associated with improved diabetes outcomes, including increased patient satisfaction and better glycemic control. Yet, disparities in SM uptake exist among older patients and racial and ethnic underserved groups. Care partners (family members or friends) may provide a means for mitigating these disparities; however, it remains unclear whether and to what extent care partners might enhance SM use.

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Chronic Foot Ulcer and Wounds

Neuropathic foot ulcers are the leading cause of nontraumatic foot amputations, particularly among patients with diabetes. Traditional methods of monitoring and managing these patients are periodic in-person clinic visits, which are passive and may be insufficient for preventing neuropathic foot ulcers and amputations. Continuous remote temperature monitoring has the potential to capture the critical period before the foot ulcers develop and to improve outcomes by providing real-time data and early interventions. For the first time, the effectiveness of such a strategy to prevent neuropathic foot ulcers and related complications among high-risk patients in a real-world commercial setting is reported.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

Digital weight management interventions (DWMIs) have the potential to support existing specialist weight management services (SWMS) in the National Health Service (NHS) to increase access to treatment for people living with obesity and type 2 diabetes. At present, there is limited real-world evidence and long-term outcomes on the potential effectiveness of DWMIs to support such services.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

In recent years, technologies promoting the digitization of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) records including app-cloud cooperation systems have emerged. Studies combining these technological interventions with support from remote health care professionals have reported improvements in glycemic control.

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Diabetes Self-Management

Diabetes is a worldwide chronic condition causing morbidity and mortality, with a growing economic burden on health care systems. Complications from poorly controlled diabetes are associated with increased socioeconomic costs and reduced quality of life. Smartphones have become an influential platform, providing feasible tools such as health apps to deliver tailored support to enhance the ability of patients with diabetes for self-management. Gro Health is a National Health Service division X–certified digital health tool used to deliver educational and monitoring support to facilitate the development of skills and practices for maintaining good health.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

Adopting a healthy diet is one of the cornerstones of type 2 diabetes (T2D) management. Apps are increasingly used in diabetes self-management, but most studies to date have focused on assessing their impact in terms of weight loss or glycemic control, with limited evidence on the behavioral factors that influence app use to change dietary habits.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

Over the past few decades, diabetes has become a serious public health concern worldwide, particularly in Bangladesh. The advancement of artificial intelligence can be reaped in the prediction of blood glucose levels for better health management. However, the practical validity of machine learning (ML) techniques for predicting health parameters using data from low- and middle-income countries, such as Bangladesh, is very low. Specifically, Bangladesh lacks research using ML techniques to predict blood glucose levels based on basic noninvasive clinical measurements and dietary and sociodemographic information.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

Reduced or delayed medical follow-ups have been reported during the COVID-19 pandemic, which may lead to worsening clinical outcomes for patients with diabetes. The Japanese government granted special permission for medical institutions to use telephone consultations and other remote communication modes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an increasing health risk for pregnant women as well as their children. Telehealth interventions targeted at the management of GDM have been shown to be effective, but they still require health care professionals for providing guidance and feedback. Feedback from wearable sensors has been suggested to support the self-management of GDM, but it is unknown how self-tracking should be designed in clinical care.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

Effective self-management of diabetes is crucial for improving clinical outcomes by maintaining glucose levels and preventing the exacerbation of the condition. Mobile health (mHealth) has demonstrated its significance in enhancing self-management practices. However, only 20% of Malaysians are familiar with mHealth technologies and use them for health management.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

Mobile health (mHealth) apps can be an evidence-based approach to improve health behavior and outcomes. Prior literature has highlighted the need for more research on mHealth personalization, including in diabetes and pregnancy. Critical gaps exist on the impact of personalization of mHealth apps on patient engagement, and in turn, health behaviors and outcomes. Evidence regarding how personalization, engagement, and health outcomes could be aligned when designing mHealth for underserved populations is much needed, given the historical oversights with mHealth design in these populations. This viewpoint is motivated by our experience from designing a personalized mHealth solution focused on Medicaid-enrolled pregnant individuals with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, many of whom also experience a high burden of social needs. We describe fundamental components of designing mHealth solutions that are both inclusive and personalized, forming the basis of an evidence-based framework for future mHealth design in other disease states with similar contexts.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

The Hypoglycaemia – MEasurement, ThResholds and ImpaCtS (Hypo-METRICS) smartphone app was developed to investigate the impact of hypoglycemia on daily functioning in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus or insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus. The app uses ecological momentary assessments, thereby minimizing recall bias and maximizing ecological validity. It was used in the Hypo-METRICS study, a European multicenter observational study wherein participants wore a blinded continuous glucose monitoring device and completed the app assessments 3 times daily for 70 days.

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