JMIR Diabetes

Emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, sensors, and informatics to help people with diabetes

Editor-in-Chief:

Caroline R. Richardson, MD, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, USA


JMIR Diabetes (JD, Editor-in-Chief: Caroline Richardson) is a PubMed-indexed journal of JMIR, the leading open-access journal in health informatics. JMIR Diabetes focuses on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics and patient education for diabetes prevention, self-management, care, and cure, to help people with diabetes.

As an open access journal, JD is read by clinicians and patients alike and has (as all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies, as well as on diabetes prevention and epidemiology.

We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews) covering for example wearable devices and trackers, mobile apps, glucose monitoring (including emerging technologies such as Google contact lens), medical devices for insulin and metabolic peptide delivery, closed loop systems and artificial pancreas, telemedicine, web-based diabetes education and elearning, innovations for patient self-management and "quantified self," diabetes-specific EHR improvements, clinical or consumer-focused software, diabetes epidemiology and surveillance, crowdsourcing and quantified self-based research data, new sensors and actuators to be applied to diabetes.

Recent Articles

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Patient Experiences with Diabetes Technology

The Diabetes Questionnaire is a digital patient-reported outcome and experience measure for adults living with diabetes. The Diabetes Questionnaire is intended for use in routine clinical visits in diabetes care and to enable patient perspectives to be integrated into the Swedish National Diabetes Register. The Diabetes Questionnaire was developed on the basis of patients’ perspectives, and evidence for its measurement qualities has been demonstrated. Patients receive an invitation to complete the questionnaire before clinical visits, and the patient and health care professional (HCP) can discuss the findings, which are instantly displayed during the visit. Implementation processes for new tools in routine care need to be studied to understand the influence of contextual factors, the support needed, and how patients and HCPs experience clinical use.

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Diabetes Self-Management

The use of digital technology to assess patients remotely can reduce clinical study costs. In the European Union, the 2D matrix code on prescription drug packaging serves as a unique identifier of a given package of medication, and thus, also of the patient receiving that medication. Scanning of the 2D matrix code may therefore allow remote patient authentication in clinical studies.

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Viewpoints on Diabetes Technology and Innovation

This study was performed to assess the system accuracy of the blood glucose monitoring system SD GlucoNavii Mentor (SD Biosensor Inc, Korea). The study procedures were based on International Organization for Standardization 15197:2013, in that capillary blood samples from 100 participants’ fingertips were measured with three reagent system lots of the self-monitoring blood glucose system. Samples were collected for comparison measurements on a hexokinase-based glucose analyzer (Cobas Integra400 Plus, Roche Instrument Center, Switzerland). Glucose concentrations were distributed as required by International Organization for Standardization 15197. For each of the 100 evaluable samples, duplicate measurements were taken from three different reagent lots, for a total of 600 measurements. Overall, 98.3% (590/600) of individual measurement results (185/186, 99.5% for glucose values <100 mg/dl and 405/414, 97.8% for glucose values ≥100 mg/dl) were within ±15 mg/dl or ±15% of the corresponding comparison method results. All results (100%) fell into the consensus error grid zones A and B, indicating only clinically acceptable results. In conclusion, the blood glucose monitoring system SD GlucoNavii Mentor device fulfilled the system accuracy criteria of the International Organization for Standardization 15197, indicating measurement accuracy sufficient for diabetes therapy.

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Exercise and Diet Tracking for Diabetes Patients

Lockdown restrictions reduce COVID-19 community transmission; however, they may pose challenges for noncommunicable disease management. A 112-day hard lockdown in Victoria, Australia (commencing March 23, 2020) coincided with an intervention trial of reducing and breaking up sitting time in desk workers with type 2 diabetes who were using a provided consumer-grade activity tracker (Fitbit).

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Reviews on Diabetes Technologies and Innovations

Accurately identifying patients with hypoglycemia is key to preventing adverse events and mortality. Natural language processing (NLP), a form of artificial intelligence, uses computational algorithms to extract information from text data. NLP is a scalable, efficient, and quick method to extract hypoglycemia-related information when using electronic health record data sources from a large population.

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Sensors for Glucose Monitoring and Diabetes Management

Continuous glucose monitors (CGM) can provide detailed information on glucose excursions. There is little information on safe transitioning from hospital back to the community for patients who have had diabetes therapies adjusted in hospital and it is unclear whether newer technologies may facilitate this process.

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Glucose Tracking and Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose

Personalized feedback is an effective behavior change technique frequently incorporated into mobile health (mHealth) apps. Innovations in data science create opportunities for leveraging the wealth of user data accumulated by mHealth apps to generate personalized health forecasts. One Drop’s digital program is one of the first to implement blood glucose forecasts for people with type 2 diabetes. The impact of these forecasts on behavior and glycemic management has not been evaluated to date.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

This paper describes the development of a mobile app for diabetes mellitus (DM) control and self-management and presents the results of long-term usage of this system in the Czech Republic. DM is a chronic disease affecting large numbers of people worldwide, and this number is continuously increasing. There is massive potential to increase adherence to self-management of DM with the use of smartphones and digital therapeutics interventions.

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Social Media for Diabetes

Individuals in need of medical care turn to crowdfunding websites to engage a “crowd” or group for financial support. In the last decade, access to insulin has decreased considerably for several reasons, including the rising cost of insulin, increasing popularity of high-deductible insurance plans, and increasing insurance premiums. Many people with diabetes are forced to ration or go without insulin, and they turn to crowdfunding websites to seek financial donations to purchase insulin needed to reduce health risks and mortality, and sustain quality of life. 

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Diabetes Education and Elearning for Patients

People with gestational diabetes have enhanced learning requirements during pregnancy, and management of their disease often requires the translation of health information into new health behavior changes. Seeking information from the internet to augment learning from health professionals is becoming more common during pregnancy. YouTube is a popular free and accessible web-based resource, which may be particularly useful for individuals with low health literacy or other barriers to receiving high-quality health care; however, the quality and content of YouTube videos varies, and little is known about those covering gestational diabetes.

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Health Coaching for Diabetes Patients

Physical activity is a major component of treatment for adolescents with obesity and prediabetes or type 2 diabetes; however, sedentary behavior remains pervasive. An SMS text message–based intervention paired with financial incentives may be an effective way to promote physical activity in this population.

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Crowdsourcing, Big Data, Quantified Self-based Research Data

People with diabetes and their support networks have developed open-source automated insulin delivery systems to help manage their diabetes therapy, as well as to improve their quality of life and glycemic outcomes. Under the hashtag #WeAreNotWaiting, a wealth of knowledge and real-world data have been generated by users of these systems but have been left largely untapped by research; opportunities for such multimodal studies remain open.

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