JMIR Diabetes

Emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, sensors, and informatics to help people with diabetes

Editor-in-Chief:

Caroline R. Richardson, MD, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, USA


JMIR Diabetes (JD, Editor-in-Chief: Caroline Richardson) is a Pubmed journal of JMIR the leading open-access journal in health informatics. JMIR Diabetes focuses on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics and patient education for diabetes prevention, self-management, care, and cure, to help people with diabetes.

As open access journal JD is read by clinicians and patients alike and have (as all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies, as well as on diabetes prevention and epidemiology.

We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews) covering for example wearable devices and trackers, mobile apps, glucose monitoring (including emerging technologies such as Google contact lens), medical devices for insulin and metabolic peptide delivery, closed loop systems and artificial pancreas, telemedicine, web-based diabetes education and elearning, innovations for patient self-management and "quantified self", diabetes-specific EHR improvements, clinical or consumer-focused software, diabetes epidemiology and surveillance, crowdsourcing and quantified self-based research data, new sensors and actuators to be applied to diabetes.

Recent Articles

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Diabetes Self-Management

The development of evidence-based care geared towards Black and Latina women living with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes is contingent upon their active recruitment into clinical interventions. Well-documented impediments to recruitment include a historical mistrust of the research community and socioeconomic factors that limit awareness and access to research studies. Although sociocultural and socioeconomic factors deter minorities from participating in clinical research, it is equally important to consider the role of stigma in chronic disease intervention studies.

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Glucose Tracking and Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose

Predictive alerts for impending hypoglycemic events enable persons with type 1 diabetes to take preventive actions and avoid serious consequences.

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Artificial Intelligence in Diabetes Care and Prevention

Between 2013 and 2015, the UK Biobank collected accelerometer traces from 103,712 volunteers aged between 40 and 69 years using wrist-worn triaxial accelerometers for 1 week. This data set has been used in the past to verify that individuals with chronic diseases exhibit reduced activity levels compared with healthy populations. However, the data set is likely to be noisy, as the devices were allocated to participants without a set of inclusion criteria, and the traces reflect free-living conditions.

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Telemedicine for Diabetes

The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing rapidly worldwide. Simultaneously, technological advances are offering new opportunities for better management of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Telemetry, the remote acquisition of patient data via a telecommunication system, is a promising field of application in eHealth and is rapidly gaining importance.

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Telemedicine for Diabetes

Patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D) experience increased morbidity, increased mortality, and higher cost of care. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is a critical component of diabetes self-management with established diabetes outcome benefits. Technological advancements in blood glucose meters, including cellular-connected devices that automatically upload SMBG data to secure cloud-based databases, allow for improved sharing and monitoring of SMBG data. Real-time monitoring of SMBG data presents opportunities to provide timely support to patients that is responsive to abnormal SMBG recordings. Such diabetes remote monitoring programs can provide patients with poorly controlled T2D additional support needed to improve critical outcomes.

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Diabetes Self-Management

Translation of diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) into a digital format can improve access, but few digital programs have demonstrated outcomes using rigorous evaluation metrics.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

The use of remote data capture for monitoring blood glucose and supporting digital apps is becoming the norm in diabetes care. One common goal of such apps is to increase user awareness and engagement with their day-to-day health-related behaviors (digital engagement) in order to improve diabetes outcomes. However, we lack a deep understanding of the complicated association between digital engagement and diabetes outcomes.

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Reviews on Diabetes Technologies and Innovations

There is a growing role of digital health technologies (DHTs) in the management of chronic health conditions, specifically type 2 diabetes. It is increasingly important that health technologies meet the evidence standards for health care settings. In 2019, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published the NICE Evidence Standards Framework for DHTs. This provides guidance for evaluating the effectiveness and economic value of DHTs in health care settings in the United Kingdom.

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Diabetes Education and Elearning for Patients

Proper training and follow-up for patients new to continuous glucose monitor (CGM) use are required to maintain adherence and achieve diabetes-related outcomes. However, CGM training is hampered by the lack of evidence-based standards and poor reimbursement. We hypothesized that web-based CGM training and education would be effective and could be provided with minimal burden to the health care team.

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Patient Experiences with Diabetes Technology

In the last decade, diabetes management has begun to transition to technology-based care, with young people being the focus of many technological advances. Yet, detailed insights into the experiences of young people and their caregivers of using technology to manage type 1 diabetes mellitus are lacking.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

There are no preprints available for open peer-review at this time. Please check back later.

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