JMIR Diabetes

Emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, sensors, and informatics to help people with diabetes

Editor-in-Chief:

Caroline R. Richardson, MD, Chair of Family Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, USA


JMIR Diabetes (JD, Editor-in-Chief: Caroline Richardson) is a PubMed-indexed journal of JMIR, the leading open-access journal in health informatics. JMIR Diabetes focuses on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics and patient education for diabetes prevention, self-management, care, and cure, to help people with diabetes.

As an open access journal, JD is read by clinicians and patients alike and has (as all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies, as well as on diabetes prevention and epidemiology.

We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews) covering for example wearable devices and trackers, mobile apps, glucose monitoring (including emerging technologies such as Google contact lens), medical devices for insulin and metabolic peptide delivery, closed loop systems and artificial pancreas, telemedicine, web-based diabetes education and elearning, innovations for patient self-management and "quantified self," diabetes-specific EHR improvements, clinical or consumer-focused software, diabetes epidemiology and surveillance, crowdsourcing and quantified self-based research data, new sensors and actuators to be applied to diabetes.

Recent Articles

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Diabetes Health Services and System Innovations

An important strategy to understand young people’s needs regarding technologies for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) management is to examine their day-to-day experiences with these technologies.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

Mobile health apps are promising tools to help patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) improve their health status and thereby achieve diabetes control and self-management. Although there is a wide array of mobile health apps for T2DM available at present, apps are not yet integrated into routine diabetes care. Acceptability and acceptance among patients with T2DM is a major challenge and prerequisite for the successful implementation of apps in diabetes care.

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Patient Experiences with Diabetes Technology

The trend of an exponential increase in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is projected to continue rising worldwide. Physical activity could help prevent T2D and the progression and complications of the disease. Therefore, we need to create opportunities for individuals to acquire the necessary knowledge and skills to self-manage their chronic condition through physical activity. eHealth is a potential resource that could facilitate self-management and thus improve population health. However, there is limited research on users’ perception of eHealth in promoting physical activity in primary care settings.

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Apps, Mobile, Wearables for Diabetes

The benefits of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM) are well established for patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and patients with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the usage and effectiveness of RT-CGM in the context of non–insulin-treated T2D has not been well studied.

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Diabetes Self-Management

Patients with diabetes may experience different needs according to their diabetes stage. These needs may be met via online health communities in which individuals seek health-related information and exchange different types of social support. Understanding the social support categories that may be more important for different diabetes stages may help diabetes online communities (DOCs) provide more tailored support to web-based users.

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Diabetes Self-Management

Individuals with type 1 diabetes represent a population with important vulnerabilities to dynamic physiological, behavioral, and psychological interactions, as well as cognitive processes. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA), a methodological approach used to study intraindividual variation over time, has only recently been used to deliver cognitive assessments in daily life, and many methodological questions remain. The Glycemic Variability and Fluctuations in Cognitive Status in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes (GluCog) study uses EMA to deliver cognitive and self-report measures while simultaneously collecting passive interstitial glucose in adults with type 1 diabetes.

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Health Coaching for Diabetes Patients

Individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are more likely to achieve optimal glycemic management when they have frequent visits with their health care team. There is a potential benefit of frequent, telemedicine interventions as an effective strategy to lower hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c).

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Diabetes Self-Management

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) management is complex and associated with significant psychosocial burden. Continuous glucose monitors (CGM) can improve disease management and outcomes and introduce new or exacerbate existing psychosocial concerns. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) can be used to capture this information, but there is no consensus on which PROMs should be used in pediatric CGM research.

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General Original Articles*

Making lifestyle changes is an essential element of abdominal obesity (AO) reduction. To support lifestyle modification and self-management, we developed an information and communication technology–based self-management system—DialBeticsLite—with a fully automated dietary evaluation function for the treatment of AO.

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Reviews on Diabetes Technologies and Innovations

Developments and evolutions in the information and communication technology sector have provided a solid foundation for the emergence of mobile health (mHealth) in recent years. The cornerstone to management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is the self-management of glycemic indices, dietary intake, and lifestyle adaptations. Given this, it is readily adaptable to incorporation of remote monitoring strategies involving mHealth solutions.

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Diabetes Self-Management

The COVID-19 lockdown imposed a sudden change in lifestyle with self-isolation and a rapid shift to the use of technology to maintain clinical care and social connections.

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Diabetes Self-Management

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) capture patients’ views on their health conditions and its management, and are increasingly used in clinical trials, including those targeting type 2 diabetes (T2D). Mobile health (mHealth) tools offer novel solutions for collecting PRO data in real time. Although patients are at the center of any PRO-based intervention, few studies have examined user engagement with PRO mHealth tools.

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